Vitrectomy

Some eye conditions require repair or removal of material from within the eye; e.g., hemorrhages, macular membranes, floaters, etc. Very small instruments are temporarily placed in the eye. These instruments allow the physician to perform the necessary tasks to allow your vision to improve. This procedure is generally performed in an outpatient hospital setting. After a short recovery time, patients are able to go home and are commonly followed up in the office the next day.

What is Avastin?

Avastin is a drug that can be injected into the eye for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration. Avastin was originally developed to treat various types of cancer, and works by blocking the growth of abnormal blood cells.

While Lucentis, a similar drug, is often administered in the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration, many believe that Avastin is similarly effective and a much less expensive treatment option.

How does Avastin Work?

Avastin works by blocking the production of a chemical called “vascular endothelial growth factor” (VEGF). Wet age-related macular degeneration is caused by the growth of abnormal blood vessels in the eye, so by blocking this chemical Avastin can slow the growth of blood vessels that can leak and cause vision loss.

How does Treatment with Avastin Work?


Avastin is administered as an outpatient procedure. Your eye will be cleaned and an anesthetic is applied in order to numb the eye, and the drug is administered using a very fine needle. It is common to need repetitive treatment over time when using Avastin, as repeat treatments are typically necessary for continued results.

EYLEA® (aflibercept) Injection

Indicated for the treatment of patients with neovascular (Wet) Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD).

Indicated for the treatment of patients with Macular Edema following Central Retinal Vein Occlusion (CRVO).

EYLEA is contraindicated in patients with ocular or periocular infections, active intraocular inflammation, or known hypersensitivity to aflibercept or to any of the excipients in EYLEA.

IMPORTANT PRESCRIBING INFORMATION FOR EYLEA® (aflibercept) INJECTION

EYLEA® (aflibercept) Injection is indicated for the treatment of patients with neovascular (Wet) Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). The recommended dose for EYLEA is 2 mg administered by intravitreal injection every 4 weeks (monthly) for the first 12 weeks (3 months), followed by 2 mg once every 8 weeks (2 months). Although EYLEA may be dosed as frequently as 2 mg every 4 weeks (monthly), additional efficacy was not demonstrated when EYLEA was dosed every 4 weeks compared to every 8 weeks.

EYLEA is indicated for the treatment of patients with Macular Edema following Central Retinal Vein Occlusion (CRVO). The recommended dose for EYLEA is 2 mg administered by intravitreal injection every 4 weeks (monthly).

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR EYLEA® (aflibercept) INJECTION

EYLEA® (aflibercept) Injection is contraindicated in patients with ocular or periocular infections, active intraocular inflammation, or known hypersensitivity to aflibercept or to any of the excipients in EYLEA.

Intravitreal injections, including those with EYLEA, have been associated with endophthalmitis and retinal detachments. Proper aseptic injection technique must always be used when administering EYLEA. Patients should be instructed to report any symptoms suggestive of endophthalmitis or retinal detachment without delay and should be managed appropriately. Intraocular inflammation has been reported during the post approval use of EYLEA.

Acute increases in intraocular pressure have been seen within 60 minutes of intravitreal injection, including with EYLEA. Sustained increases in intraocular pressure have also been reported after repeated intravitreal dosing with VEGF inhibitors. Intraocular pressure and the perfusion of the optic nerve head should be monitored and managed appropriately.

There is a potential risk of arterial thromboembolic events (ATEs) following use of intravitreal VEGF inhibitors, including EYLEA, defined as nonfatal stroke, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or vascular death (including deaths of unknown cause). The incidence of ATEs in the VIEW 1 and VIEW 2 wet AMD studies in patients treated with EYLEA was 1.8% during the first year. The incidence of ATEs in the COPERNICUS and GALILEO CRVO studies was 0% in patients treated with EYLEA compared with 1.4% in patients receiving sham control during the first six months.

The most common adverse reactions (≥5%) reported in patients receiving EYLEA were conjunctival hemorrhage, eye pain, cataract, vitreous detachment, vitreous floaters, and increased intraocular pressure.

Serious adverse reactions related to the injection procedure have occurred in <0.1% of intravitreal injections with EYLEA including endophthalmitis, traumatic cataract, increased intraocular pressure, and vitreous detachment.

Please see the full Prescribing Information for EYLEA.

The product information in this site is intended only for residents of the United States. The product discussed herein may have different labeling in different countries.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Source:http://www.eylea.us

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved LUCENTIS for the treatment of patients with neovascular or wet macular degeneration. LUCENTIS was specifically developed for intraocular use. It has been developed to treat the underlying cause of wet macular degeneration by targeting the molecular pathway that controls the formation of new blood vessels. LUCENTIS is designed to bind and inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein that is believed to play a critical role in the formation of new blood vessels. VEGF has been shown to lead to wet macular degeneration progression and central vision loss.

LUCENTIS is a series of injections given directly into the eye every four weeks. Your physician will tell you how long you will need to receive the injections.

To learn more about Lucentis, please click on the link below:

http://www.lucentis.com/lucentis/